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Ragtime

Neil Simon Theatre |  Broadway  | November, 2009

  • Best Revival of a Musical
  • Best Direction of a Musical
  • Best Performance by a Leading Actress in a Musical
  • Best Performance by a Featured Actor in a Musical
  • Best Scenic Design of a Musical
  • Best Lighting Design of a Music

Book by Terrence McNally, lyrics by Lynn Ahrens, and music by Stephen Flaherty

Directed and choreographed by Marcia Milgrom Dodge

At the dawn of a new century, everything is changing…and anything is possible. Direct from a sold-out extended run at the Kennedy Center, Ragtime returns to Broadway in an acclaimed new production as ravishing as it is relevant. Set in the volatile melting pot of turn-of-the-century New York, Ragtime weaves together three distinctly American tales — that of a stifled upper-class wife, a determined Jewish immigrant, and a daring young Harlem musician — united by their courage, compassion and belief in the promise of the future. Set to a glorious, Tony Award®-winning score with a Tony®-winning book based on the classic E. L. Doctorow novel, Ragtime features a 28-piece orchestra and a vibrant cast of 40. (Read more at broadway.com.)


"Timely, stunning, uplifting, and exhilarating. Beautifully sung by an impeccable cast and played with exquisite dimension. This is musical theater at its most vibrant. Ragtime conveys hope, opportunity and success. A transporting sensory experience."

- Variety

"Dazzling. This rich incarnation is grounded in reality. A wonderful blend of nostalgia, anger, patriotism and hard-won idealism. Marcia Milgrom Dodge's staging is superior and she has corralled a first-rate ensemble. Grade: A."

- Entertainment Weekly

"Ragtime is brilliantly reborn on Broadway! It's nothing short of a masterpiece."

- Bloomberg

"A supple cast under Marcia Milgrom Dodge's vibrant direction. Lynn Ahrens and Stephen Flaherty's songs are well-crafted and genuinely soulful. Terrence McNally's book tugs at your heart and conscience with such artful aggression that only an ogre could resist the urge to weep at some points and smile at others."

- USA Today